Freephone information line: 1800 45 45 55

Before the smear test

  1. Why is the Personal Public Service Number (PPS No.) requested on the form?
  2. What is the CSP ID and does it need to be recorded on the form?
  3. If a woman has a first programme smear test at 57, 58 or 59 years – will she be re-called?
  4. Should a clinically indicated smear test be taken?
  5. Does a smear test need to be taken before inserting an IUD?

Why is the Personal Public Service Number (PPS No.) requested on the form?

The Personal Public Service Number (PPS No.) is a unique identifier for each person. Its use by CervicalCheck is to ensure that a smear test result is matched with the right woman on the Cervical Screening Register. In turn, this ensures that CervicalCheck will issue a letter to the right woman advising her of her next step in the screening programme.

In addition, the Primary Care Reimbursement Scheme (PCRS) requires a woman’s PPS No. for payment processing and reimbursement.

 

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What is the CSP ID and does it need to be recorded on the form?

The CSP ID is a unique identifier assigned to each woman on the Cervical Screening Register.

The CSP ID is included on all correspondence issued from the programme in relation to a woman. The Woman’s Eligibility Check facility on this website will also provide a woman’s CSP ID if the details entered are correct.

The CSP ID will only be present on a cytology result to a doctor if the number is recorded on the Cervical Cytology Form at the time of smeartaking.

It is not mandatory to record the CSP ID on the Cervical Cytology Form but where it is available it should be provided. As a unique identifier, it helps to ensure that a screening event is matched to the right woman’s record.

 

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If a woman has a first programme smear test at 57, 58 or 59 years – will she be re-called?

Yes. If a woman of this age is new to CervicalCheck and her smear test result is normal, CervicalCheck will issue a letter of re-call to her in advance of her second test due date (in 3 years’ time).

All women who commence in the programme before the age of 60 years require two normal smear test results (routine screening recommendations) before exiting the programme.

 

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Should a clinically indicated smear test be taken?

A smear test is a screening test, not a diagnostic test. If a woman presents with clinical concerns or indications she should be referred to gynaecology for further assessment. A smear test is not a diagnostic test. It will not give the cause for abnormal bleeding or symptoms.

The referral should not be delayed by either taking a smear test or awaiting results.

Further information:

 

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Does a smear test need to be taken before inserting an IUD?

No, unless the woman is due for a smear test in accordance with the interval recommended by CervicalCheck following a previous smear test or a discharge from colposcopy.

Further information:

 

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Is cuid den tSeirbhís Náisiúnta Scagthástála é CervicalCheck
Bosca Oifig Phoist 161, Luimneach
Saorghlao 1800 45 45 55
CervicalCheck is part of the National Cancer Screening Service
PO Box 161 Limerick
Freephone 1800 45 45 55

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Is cuid den Rannóg Sláinte agus Folláine i bhFeidhmeannacht na Seirbhíse Sláinte í an tSeirbhís Náisiúnta Scagthástála. Cuimsíonn sí BreastCheck – An Clár Náisiúnta Scagthástála Cíoch, CervicalCheck – An Clár Náisiúnta Scagthástála Ceirbheacs, BowelScreen – An Clár Náisiúnta Scagthástála Putóige agus Diabetic RetinaScreen – An Clár Náisiúnta Scagthástála Reitiní do Dhiaibéitigh.

The National Screening Service is part of the Health and Wellbeing Division of the Health Service Executive. It encompasses BreastCheck – The National Breast Screening Programme, CervicalCheck – The National Cervical Screening Programme, BowelScreen – The National Bowel Screening Programme and Diabetic RetinaScreen – The National Diabetic Retinal Screening Programme.